Residential Design Guidelines

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Residential Design Guidelines
WINDOWS

 

Retain historic windows where possible. Where replacement is necessary, new units should match the old in size, shape, and arrangement of panes. Window openings should not be reduced in size.

Whenever possible, choose new units of wood, rather than metal. If metal is selected, it should have a baked enamel finish.

Retain all decorative trim around windows, including lintels, pediments, and hoods.

Non-rectangular or irregularly shaped modern windows (such as trapezoids) should not be installed, especially on the front of the building.

windows
5 windows

Mid-19th century - Italianate - Queen Anne - Arts and Crafts Early 20th century

Windows give character and expression to the building. The historic spacing of windows is very important, as are the elements which surround the window: the sill, the lintel, and decorative moldings.

Finding appropriate replacement sash is no longer an impossible task. Most manufacturers now offer a variety of energy-efficient windows that are compatible with nineteenth- and twentieth-century architectural character.

Traditional Window Styles
Replacement windows should closely match the historic units.

traditional windows

Common Window Types

common windows

Modern Windows
Avoid styles which are incompatible with the historic style of the house. Overscaled half-round and trapezoid windows often do not enhance the historic appearance of the building facade.

Single-hung

Double-hung (two moveable sash)

Adding a Window
New windows sometimes need to be placed in a remodeled space such as an attic. Consider grouping several traditional windows (as they might have originally been used) instead of installing a single, large expanse of glass.

replacement windows casement and sliding

   Casement                 Sliding
 

Residential Design Guidelines: Facade   Doors   Windows   Trim   Porches   Roof   Additions